Stages of life

April 1st, Meaning of Life Life is a continuous progress.

Stages of life

The first stage of life, occupying the years from conception and birth to age seven, is the stage of the human individual's vital-physical adaptation to the world into which he or she is born.

Stages of life

In this first stage the being learns "simple" skills like focusing with the eyes, grasping and manipulating objects, walking, talking, assimilating and converting food and breath into energy, and controlling bladder and bowels.

Individuation The first stage of life is the process of adapting to life as a separate individual, no longer bound to the mother. Most important for the first stage child is the process of eating and learning to accept sustenance from outside the mother's body.

In fact, this whole stage of life could be described as an ordeal of weaning, or individuation. Tremendous physical growth occurs in the first stage of life the first seven or so years as well as an enormous amount of learning; one begins to manage bodily energies and begins to explore the physical world.

Acquiring basic motor skills is a key aspect of the first stage of life: If the first stage of life unfolds as it should, the separation from the mother completes itself in basic terms.

But there is a tendency in most human beings to struggle with this original individuation, or to not accept its necessity. The result of such resistance is that, by the age of seven or so, we are left with a chronic usually lifelong feeling of being separate from the source of life and support.

Note that this feeling of separation from the food source is an overlay on top of the original feeling and activity of separation that is the ego itself, the self-contraction. Stage 1 represents individuation, the struggle to transcend infantile dependency on the mother sustenance and to accept the reality of independent bodily existence.

Failure to adapt to this stage creates separation and a sense of disconnection from the sustaining source of life and doubt betrayal of those and the world on whom one depends for love and support.

The primary reactive emotion in the failure to adapt to this stage is fear. Adi Da describes the signs of fulfillment of the first stage of life as: Thus, the fulfillment of the first stage of life is marked by the beginnings of the movement toward more complex socialization, cooperation with others, and sensitivity to the total world of Nature.

The first stage of life is the process of psycho-physical individuation, based on identification with the separate and personal gross physical body in the waking state. The first stage of life is also associated with the oral function. At birth, the infant is separated from the situation of unity with the human mother, and this begins a struggle with the fact of individual existence.

This struggle is displayed in the context of oral dependence on the mother as a separate body. Whatever occurs in the drama of breast-feeding and the transition to food sources apart from the mother's body, human beings tend to develop a fundamental reactive habit at this stage.

Un-happy individuation tends to be associated with a feeling of separation and, thus, only a partial willingness to relinquish the feeling of dependency on the mother.

This feeling of separation ultimately involves the sense of disconnection from the ultimate source of support and love, and it also becomes a general doubt or anxiety about other human beings on whom one depends for love.

Sex-differentiation begins even at this stage, but all relationships are experienced from the viewpoint of dependency and reluctance to accept the situation of individuated existence. A child has fully adapted to the first stage of life when he or she shows the following signs: The child has achieved physical, emotional, mental, and psychic independence from the mother, and is moved towards a more complex socialization with adults and peers.

Critical Evaluation

From the moment of birth, and then continuing throughout the first stage of life, the child is adapting to the fact that he or she is a person autonomous from the mother, When this adaptation is complete, when the child has fully grown beyond the feeling sense of identification with the mother, then the child can be said to be fully individuated, and mature in the first stage of life.

It is important to note that even in the maturity of the first stage of life the child is still functionally dependent on others. In other words, the child is still not capable of living independently on his or her own without the help of adults.

What has been relinquished is the feeling sense of the "two-who-are-one" bond with the mother and a happy resolution about the child's actual circumstance of dependency on, rather than identification with, others.

At the point of maturity in this stage, the child naturally turns outward in his or her feeling towards the greater realm of relationships with others, because the concentration on the mother as the sole source of sustenance, support, and identification has been outgrown.

The child feels sustained by food, other individuals, and the Divine. For the young child, the mother is intimately associated with the sense of sustenance. Because of this, food and the whole relationship to food-taking is one of the primary arenas in which an individual's maturity in the first stage is demonstrated.

A child who is mature in the first stage feels sustained, and has a healthy and uncomplicated relationship to food. Similarly, the child feels sustained by other individuals upon whom he or she depends. And most importantly, the mature first stager feels sustained by and connected to the Living Divine, who is the Ultimate Source of support and love.

The child demonstrates a feeling orientation to other people and the realm of nature. As the first stager has increasingly relinquished his or her concentration on the mother, he or she has naturally become increasingly aware of and sensitive to relationships with others.

Thus, simultaneous with maturity in the first stage of life, the child demonstrates an awakening of feeling-sensitivity to the relational realm.

This truly marks the point of readiness to begin the second stage. At this point, the mature first stager should be responsible for the rudimentary relational practices of using manners, being respectful of adults, and being responsive and obedient when asked to go beyond himself or herself.

Stages of life

An individual who is not fully mature in the first stage of life tends to associate individuation with a feeling of separation. This primarily involves the sense of being separate or cut-off from the Divine.The Four Stages of Life in the Human Life Cycle Developing an understanding of the different stages of life can help to better explain human life and the challenges it presents.

It is important to understand that each of the stages presented in the following can act as a trap that prevents a person’s development. The stages of life will change too as our societies and world views are impacted by great advances in science and expectations to fit within this new schema.

I am personally very excited to see where it takes me as I softly and respectfully accept who I am and how I can play in this world.

Life is a bitch. Then you die. So while staring at my navel the other day, I decided that that bitch happens in four stages. Here they are. We are born helpless.

We can’t walk, can’t talk, can’t feed ourselves, can’t even do our own damn taxes. As children, the way we’re wired to learn is. Stages of Life Aesthetics Meet the Doctor David S. Klein, MD has practiced pain medicine for over 35 years and is the author of over 50 published articles and textbook chapters.

Moreover, each stage of the individual’s life is a reflection of the stages of development that humanity as a whole has progressed through over millions of years. The Four Stages of Life in the Human Life Cycle Developing an understanding of the different stages of life can help to better explain human life and the challenges it presents.

It is important to understand that each of the stages presented in the following can act as a trap that prevents a person’s development.

The Four Stages of Life | Mark Manson